Top 6 Most Important Employee Laws

Top 6 Most Important Employee Laws

Around five out of every 100 employees in the U.S. sustain an injury while on the job every year. Because of these accidents, employee laws exist. Employee laws encompass everything from fair wages to product liability issues and ensure you, the employee, basic rights while working. What Employee Laws Cover: An employment lawyer will explain to you that if you’ve been injured on the job, you may have the right to file a personal injury claim. An estimated 2 million people that are injured every year on the job end up being hospitalized — which is a stepping stone to filing a work related injury claim. What Employment Attorneys Do: Employment rights attorneys are very well versed in personal injury law and work to help their client gather information about their work-related injury, prove that there is substantial evidence against the defendant that the environment was not safe, and plead the client’s case in court. Common Employee Laws: Fair Labor Standards Act. This law prescribes wage standards and overtime pay for all employees. This affects most private and public employment and requires employers to pay their employees the federally set minimum wage limit. If your employer does not abide by this law, you should call up your labor attorney. Occupational Safety and Health Act. Under this act, safety and health conditions within private industries are regulated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and its approved state programs. All employers under the act must make sure their facilities meet standard safety regulations and health standards. Workers Compensation. No matter if you work for a private company or a...
Does My Employer Need to Give Two Weeks Notice – Employee Laws

Does My Employer Need to Give Two Weeks Notice – Employee Laws

[custom_frame_left][/custom_frame_left]Over the past 20 years, the number of wrongful termination lawsuits filed has increased 260%.  The economy has been stumbling along for the past few years, and people who find themselves without a job as the result of unfair practices might realize that a lawsuit is essential for making sure they are covered until they can find a new employer. If you decide to move forward with a wrongful dismissal lawsuit, you want to know whether the facts are on your side. Here are three common questions concerning different aspects of employee laws. 1. What are My Rights as a Pregnant Employee? The Pregnancy Discrimination Act says that businesses with 15 or more employees are required to treat pregnant employees the same as they would any employee or applicant. If you cannot perform your job while pregnant, your employer has to treat you as they would anyone else with a temporary disability. Your employer is not allowed to ask you about your future plans for pregnancy planning and use this as a basis for making decisions regarding employment, raises, benefits, et cetera. You may have additional rights for family leave time, depending on how many employees your company has. 2. Does My Employer Need to Give Me Two Weeks’ Notice? The common two weeks’ notice that employees and employers give before separation is an industry courtesy, but not a part of employee laws. “At-will employment” means that no notice is required. The exception is if you signed or agreed to an employment contract, in which it was indicated that specific steps would be taken before termination, and your employer...
Were Your Rights as an Employee Violated by Your Termination?

Were Your Rights as an Employee Violated by Your Termination?

[custom_frame_left][/custom_frame_left]This past week, a former police officer of Hardeeville, SC named Leah Frank received a $30,000 wrongful termination settlement. The police department fired Frank in December 2010. Frank said that she was fired not because of her performance, but because she was sexually harassed and passed up for a promotion because of her gender. The court agreed. Although she did finally receive compensation, it’s worth noting that this case took two years to get through the court system. Suing for wrongful termination might be the right choice, but it isn’t always an easy one. Here are several facts to keep in mind if you believe your rights as an employee have been violated owing to the conditions of your termination. What are My Rights as an Employee? Termination as a result of speech is one of the most common issues to be picked up by media outlets. Recently, communications director Justine Sacco wrote on Twitter before leaving on a business trip, “Going to Africa. Hope I don’t get AIDS. Just kidding. I’m white!” The response to this commentary was so quick, that Sacco lost her job before she even stepped off the plane. By firing her, was her First Amendment right to free speech violated? No. Employers can dismiss employees for speech in the workplace, or outside of it. Though this might seem unfair, employees are seen as company representatives. Beyond that, employers themselves can be sued if, for example, the speech of some employees makes others uncomfortable enough that it constitutes workplace harassment. Can Wrongful Termination Lawyers Represent Whistle Blowers? Whistle blowers are employees who observe wrongdoings in...