Understanding Wrongful Termination Laws

Understanding Wrongful Termination Laws

Do you believe your job termination was fair and legal? If not, you may have a wrongful dismissal case on your hands. Also called wrongful termination or wrongful discharge, this describes a situation in which an employee is let go by the employer under circumstances where the termination does not line up with the terms of an employment contract, or goes against a section of employment law. The Statistics: Employee lawsuits have increased around 400% over the past 20 years in the United States. This could be due to more people knowing their rights as a worker, or due to employer negligence. Many times, wrongful dismissal cases are the result of a work-related injury. Winning a personal injury case can often result in compensation for any lost wages, pain, suffering, and the cost of medical treatment. Wrongful termination lawyers will be able to take on your case. Qualifications for a Lawsuit You may qualify for wrongful dismissal compensation if you have been terminated for any of the following reasons. Discrimination: Your employer cannot fire you because of your race, nationality, religion, sex, age, creed, or sexual orientation. Retaliation: You cannot be let go by an employer if you are looking into filing a claim for being discriminated against. You are not allowed to have your employment contract terminated if you refuse to commit an illegal act. For example, having your boss tell you to purchase liquor for a minor is illegal. If your employer does not follow specific company guidelines on the firing process, you may also have a wrongful termination case at hand. Wrongful Termination Process If you...
How One Girl's Facebook Post Lost Her Father an $80,000 Employment Settlement

How One Girl's Facebook Post Lost Her Father an $80,000 Employment Settlement

[custom_frame_left][/custom_frame_left]In this social media age, it’s not surprising that there’s often an overlap with the legal world, and posts to websites like Facebook and Twitter. This past week, a Facebook post resulted in one family losing out on an $80,000 settlement.[clear] Originally a Wrongful Dismissal Case for Discrimination The case Gulliver Sch., Inc. v. Snay was originally settled, with the defense agreeing to pay the plaintiff. Snay had been a former head at Gulliver Preparatory School, and filed an age discrimination complaint after his 2010-11 contract was not renewed. Eventually, Snay and Gulliver Preparatory agreed to settle with $10,000 back pay, an $80,000 settlement, and $60,000 for Snay’s wrongful termination lawyers. Everything seemed fine. The plaintiff’s daughter, however, immediately took to Facebook to tell her 1,200 followers — including many former and current Gulliver students — that they had won the case, and “Gullivan is now officially paying for my vacation to Europe this summer. SUCK IT.” Word quickly spread, and got back to the school administration. Gullivan refused to pay the settlement, saying that the daughter’s post not only violated the confidentiality provision, but proved the plaintiff had violated by telling his daughter. A hearing was held to determine whether or not the daughter’s knowledge and Facebook post were in violation of the agreement. Snay argued that he and his wife had to tell his daughter something, as she had been very worried about the outcome. Don’t Expect Your Facebook Posts to Stay Private The court wrote, however, that the parties had agreed to clear and unambiguous terms regarding breaching of contract, and “Snay violated the agreement by...